PDA

View Full Version : Eye Candy


pbrown
01-09-2007, 09:16 PM
Here is a picture of the engine in my 62.

Ranchero_65
01-11-2007, 12:07 AM
NICE !!!:shift: :D

Alsprint
01-14-2007, 11:07 AM
Now thats a CLEAN look!!! Inspiring! Al

Dan
01-19-2007, 11:32 PM
WOW! I can't wait 'till mine looks like that. Nice job!!

Cougsteve
01-20-2007, 02:23 PM
Ohhhhh...yahhhh! Nice!

I'm going to have to try and make it over to your side of the mountains sometime to see some of the members rides.

Later,

Cougsteve

BillP 98201
01-23-2007, 12:42 AM
Some day when I grow up..............

new_falcon_owner
07-07-2007, 04:07 PM
any more pix of your engine bay? looks real nice in there.

rick

pbrown
10-04-2008, 09:02 PM
Here is an updated photo for anyone that is interested. Changes include a new Monte Carlo bar, new stainless heater hoses, and the wiring has been cleaned up a bit.

http://www.rainierfalcons.com/gallery/data/500/medium/Complete_Engine.JPG

falcon cobra
10-05-2008, 04:32 PM
Looks good patrick, where did you get the bar? some are straight and some are curved, not sure why that is, but they sure help, also where is the hose to your vacume advance??
john h:shift:

pbrown
10-05-2008, 04:38 PM
Looks good patrick, where did you get the bar? some are straight and some are curved, not sure why that is, but they sure help, also where is the hose to your vacume advance??
john h:shift:

The bar came from Falcon Enterprises and was chromed at Art Brass Plating. The curve is to clear air cleaners but think it wouldonly be needed for a dual quad or tri-power setup.

I don't have the vacuum advance hooked up right now. I'll get to that in time. I need to replace the stock non-adjustable unit for one of the aftermarket adjustable cans.

falcon cobra
10-07-2008, 02:17 PM
Hey..patrick. what kind of intake manifold do you have? and do you use a ele. fuel pump?...
john h

pbrown
10-07-2008, 02:21 PM
what kind of intake manifold do you have

That is an Edelbrock Performer RPM Air-Gap with the Endurashine finish.

and do you use a ele. fuel pump?...


Yes I do.

BadBird
10-07-2008, 06:41 PM
Patrick, when you built your engine did you do a first run in the car or on a engine stand. I can't make up my mind where to do the fire up of my engine. Larry

pbrown
10-07-2008, 06:45 PM
Patrick, when you built your engine did you do a first run in the car or on a engine stand. I can't make up my mind where to do the fire up of my engine. Larry

I did it in the car. I don't have a stand setup for running engines.

Luva65wagon
10-09-2008, 10:17 PM
Although I thought it would be cool someday to build an engine stand to run engines, I've always talked myself out of it. They take up a lot of room and heck, of the 20 or so engines I've built they always seem to run just fine once I put them in the vehicle. So why, unless you're making a monument... or one of those engines you see firing up every 5 minutes at the swap meet... would you consider doing otherwise? Just curious.

BadBird
10-11-2008, 10:28 AM
Thanks for the very good info. Somewhere in the past during discussions here I was reading how to make a cheap engine run stand out of purchased storage stands by adding a few items to check temp, oil pressure, etc.
I don't have much experience, (one) in building engines so this one has me a little apprehensive. Since my car isn't painted yet, it was tempting to run the engine before paint. But, I came to the same conclusion that the easiest way to run the engine is to install it in the car. Just checking to see how others went through the thought process. Larry

Luva65wagon
10-12-2008, 10:20 PM
Most of the cheap engine stands don't have actual mounts for the engine. They just let you set the engine on some supports to keep it from tipping over. You'd want to build it with front (side) and rear mounts to take up a couple bolt holes in the rear. You'd also have to mount a radiator to the stand. So, as I implied earlier, by the time you have all this built you've got a box about 3 feet square or more to put somewhere. I suppose you could design it as a bolt together thing so you could disassemble it later. A lot of work for one engine IMHO.

On a more practical note, just be sure that when you do fire it up, make sure you have everything ready to go. Be sure to use a good high-viscosity lube when assembling it first off (don't be shy with assembly lube) and then just before you're ready to fire it up get it as tuned as you can. Make sure you've got the engine and radiator filled with coolant. Fill the crankcase with oil and prime the pump and filter. For that I use a drill motor and a long extension with a socket the size of the pump shaft; like a 1/4" drive extension and a deep socket taped to it to keep it from falling off into the engine. There are commercial priming shafts you can buy as well to minimize dropping something into the bottom of the pan by accident. If you're using conventional cam and lifters you've got to break them in the first time you start the engine, which is essentially a rather high rev (2000'ish RPM) run for about 20 minutes. Failure to do this can ruin a cam. Once the engine has run for the cam break-in you can then do a better tune and time on it. You really don't have the luxury to start and stop the engine to try and get things right. Not as hard as it may sound, though, really.

Good luck!