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  #1  
Unread October 24th, 2018, 12:26 PM
dave b dave b is online now
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shock tower braces

hello, taking on the front suspension of my '61 Ranchero. took it in to get aligned and was given a laundry list of repairs to be made before that job could get done. On the list was right shock tower needs to be massaged. heir explanation made sense although I don't think they noticed the condition of my shock tower braces. When I was removing the coil springs I saw that not only have they been welded but they are bent up by the firewall. I'm wondering if I could install an export brace to make it right. The new tires are badly cupped on the inner side.
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  #2  
Unread October 26th, 2018, 10:58 PM
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Luva65wagon Luva65wagon is online now
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Dave,

It takes a lot to bend the originals, so be sure to inspect the inner (front/rear) fender aprons for signs of wrinkles too. The car may have hit something in its 57 year history.

There are two types of aftermarket shock-tower braces; solid one-piece stamped and Heim-joint style; the latter being (in my opinion) cosmetic pieces more so than the originals and the one-piece version in terms of structural rigidity. I've helped install both types and the Heim-joint style is better than nothing (which I've seen on these cars too), but used the one-piece version on my Ranchero, along with Monte Carlo bar and really liked how solid it was.

Less Monte Carlo bar...http://www.rainierfalcons.com/forums...2&d=1383592785

Pros/Cons:

One-piece Version- Pros: very stiff; adds clearance above brake master; easily bolts into place. Cons: If you have had any previous movement, these will fight you to line up their mounting holes; may not "land" where they need to land requiring significant finessing.

Heim-joint style- Pros: easily adaptable to any shape your engine bay may be in; look sporty; far more added space for things that may otherwise interfere; some include a Monte Carlo bar option, which will help with the following con. Cons: You are bolting these to the cowl/firewall intersection, which isn't stiff when you attach a flexible joint to this spot. Inward flex of the towers will push against these bars and flex the firewall/cowl intersection upward. Adding the Monte Carlo bar will provide side-to-side resistance to tower movement and compensate a bit for the weaker attachment at the cowl.

Hope this helps!
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  #3  
Unread October 27th, 2018, 06:29 PM
dave b dave b is online now
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Thanx Roger! I was eyeballing the set up from total control systems but I don't see how that would get it close to where it is supposed to be to begin with. I suppose i could use the export brace as a reference point. there is a frame shop here in Seattle on 15th which is close to home. I'd like to see what they charge
for getting it close to spec. no apparent wrinkles on inner or outter fenders.
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