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Old 08-14-2009, 02:51 PM
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Tools for cyl. head porting

I've got the head off my 200 I-6, but am having a hard time finding the tools to port with. Have called all of the tool towns, as well as Harbor Freight with no luck. I found this on the Summit website but it looks like a bit more than I need - or is it typical?

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SU...0/?image=large

These appear to be some sort of grit like paper wrapped around the bit - I was thinking you'd be using some kind of grinding stone. Well, not stone but you know what I mean - like in dremel kits.

Any suggestions where to look for the individual pieces, and what they are actually called would be appreciated. Thanks.
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Old 08-14-2009, 03:26 PM
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pbrown pbrown is offline
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What you need is a die grinder (either air or electric) and some cutting dies. Look at URLs below to get an idea. The metal cutting dies and what you would used to remove large bits and get the basic shape. Then you would switch to the paper rolls to smooth it out.

Don't cut into a water jacket.

Here is a nice set from Eastwood.
http://www.eastwood.com/8pc-dual-cut...nch-shank.html

They also have a porting kit.
http://www.eastwood.com/engine-porti...html?reltype=2


Some random URLs.
http://www.heavydutystore.com/die-gr...ts-c-1683.html
http://www.sgstool.com/products/burs.asp
http://www.masterwholesale.com/shop/...nder-Bits.html
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Old 08-14-2009, 04:08 PM
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Thanks for the links, Patrick - this stuff is pricier than I expected.

Kenny, if you see this, maybe you can pinpoint which shape of bits in this link you used on your head in the exhaust ports (I'm not working under the valves this time around) on your 200 head.

http://www.heavydutystore.com/die-gr...ts-c-1683.html

I haven't even checked sears or other hardware stores for carbide tips - will do so this weekend. Thanks for the water jacket warning - I've been consulting the guys on the Ford Six performance forum about where and where not to grind.
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Old 08-14-2009, 05:39 PM
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I have the "nose tree shape" but anything with that general shape would be good. If you're only doing the exhaust, one of these carbide bits and small kit would do. SAI-260012 is a bit cheaper from Summit.

I would really consider taking out your valves and working the bowls a little. And at least lap the valves if you're not doing a valve job. I'm not convinced that only working the exhaust ports will do much but I'm not a expert on this.
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Old 08-14-2009, 08:06 PM
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Thanks, Kenny - I'll ask about doing exhaust only on the FSP. Besides not having all the valve removal tools, I'm just short on time. Lapping - haven't heard that term before. Is that around the base of where the valve stem goes in?
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Old 08-14-2009, 08:15 PM
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I have a spring compressor if you want to drop by this weekend.

Lapping is a process of spinning the valve while pushing it against the seat with an abrasive compound. The tool is just a wooden handle with a suction cup on one end. It a good thing to do if you aren't going to have the seats and valves ground.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhXsH12Rg6s
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Old 08-14-2009, 10:57 PM
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Also, it might be good to keep the valves, springs, and keepers numbered so they go in the same position as they came out of. Couldn't hurt. They're really easy to remove. Probably 20 minutes to get everything out and bagged.

I wonder if soaking the valve parts in Chem-dip would be a good idea if you're reusing parts?

Pat. Should you lap valves even if you have a fresh valve job or is that good the way it is.
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Old 08-15-2009, 09:31 PM
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Luva65wagon Luva65wagon is offline
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Thor,

Removing the valves is not even an option if you are porting anything -- it is required. You'll have to clean everything up thoroughly when you do this type of job. Then, if you are removing the valves you must, at the very least, lap them -- and as Kenny said -- keep them in order.

FWIW I worked in an automotive machine shop for about 3 years just out of high school and did probably a dozen heads a week there (that was my deal) -- so you can't rush this sort of thing. We lapped every head we did regardless of the valves being new or ground in the shop -- and then did a solvent leak check before delivering them. The difference between a smooth running engine and one that is not is often at the mercy of the condition of the valves and we rarely had a rework job. If you're going to take it apart, do it right.

If you do nothing else, if this is a used head, you should borrow that spring compressor, lap the valves and replace the valve seals. A hand lapper and some Clover lapping compound will cost you maybe $15...

And of course if you pull the valves you should check the guides for excessive play and... and... and...
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Last edited by Luva65wagon; 08-15-2009 at 09:33 PM.
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  #9  
Old 08-16-2009, 12:38 PM
Jerry Kirby Jerry Kirby is offline
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Thor,

Maybe a dumb idea but have you thought about having it done? The guy that built my engine is Dave Bliss at 253-847-2742. He is in Spanaway, does great work and I am sure he would do all or part for a fair price. Why buy a bunch of expensive tools you will never use again. Just my .02

Jerry
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